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Graduate Colloquium Speakers

Spring 2014

When: Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:30 p.m.
Where: PM 253
Topic:  Computing and the Brain
Speaker: Mark Hereld, Argonne National Laboratory

Co-sponsored by the Graduate Colloquium Committee and the Department of Computer Science.

Spring 2013

When: Thursday, March 21, 2013, 3:30 p.m.
Where: PM 253
Lecture:  What Can We Learn from a Reading Tutor that Listens?
Speaker: Jack Mostow, Research Professor at Carnegie Mellon University in Robotics, Machine Learning, Language Technologies, and Human-Computer Interaction.

Abstract: Children learn to read in different ways, some faster than others and each responding better to different types of instruction.Schools may not have enough human resources to offer each student the specialized education that he or she needs. Project LISTEN's Reading Tutor listens to children read aloud and helps them to learn to read. Besides logging tutorial interactions in fine-grained, longitudinal detail, it carries out within-subject, randomized controlled experiments. The talk will describe various methods for generating and mining such data in order to evaluate the relative efficacy of different types of instruction and practice, and some of the lessons learned from doing so.

Co-sponsored by the Graduate Colloquium Committee and the Department of Computer Science.

Fall 2012

When: Thursday, October 4, 2012, 3:30 p.m.
Where: PM 253
Lecture: Interactive Simulations of Complex Systems and Spiral Wave Dynamics: exploiting graphics processing units on a laptop or PC for real time calculations over the internet.
Speaker: Dr. Flavio H. Fenton

Abstract: A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is a specialized electronic circuit designed to rapidly access and manipulate memory to accelerate the generation of images for fast output to a display; however, over the past decade due to its massively parallel architecture structure, it has become a mean to accelerate general purpose scientific and engineering computing. WebGL is a new web-based cross-platform technology that allows the execution of JavaScript and Shader codes directly to a computer's GPU from a web browser without the need for any plug-ins. Therefore it is now possible to run high-performance parallel computing simulations over the web on a local PC or laptop independent of the operating system used. In this talk I will show how the complicated spatiotemporal dynamics of reaction-diffusion equations (which are typical of biological systems including the electrical dynamics of the heart) can be simulated in large domains and studied in real time using GPUs. I also will describe how we developed an interactive educational module incorporating GPU-based simulations that teaches cardiac dynamics and the development of arrhythmias and has been used successfully at various levels ranging from middle school to undergraduate and graduate students.

Co-sponsored by the Graduate Colloquium Committee and the Department of Computer Science.

Spring 2012

When: Thursday, March 22, 2012, 3:30 p.m.
Where: PM 253
Lecture: Nimbus: Building an Outsourcing Ecosystem for Science
Speaker: Dr. Kate Keahey of Argonne National Laboratory.
Abstract: TBA

Co-sponsored by the Graduate Colloquium Committee and the Department of Computer Science.